Susan Doherty Hannaford

Susan Doherty Hannaford

Susan Doherty Hannaford

Dr. Stephanie Protze

Dr. Stephanie Protze

 

Healing Beyond Traditional Medicine

May 2nd, 1:00-3:00 pm

Can using your mind help heal your body? Susan Doherty, a Montreal resident, will speak about her experience receiving a live-saving stem cell transplant for a rare disease. She learned to own her illness, to have faith, and to stay positive using alternative wellness practices including meditation, reiki and exercise.

Learn the science of Stem Cell Medicine involved in Susan's treatment from the Leading Stem Cell Research facility - The McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine.


Bios

Susan Doherty Hannaford

Susan Doherty Hannaford is a Montreal writer. Her debut novel, A Secret Music was published in 2015.

Susan began her working life at Maclean’s Magazine in Toronto. After Maclean’s, she worked for a digital publishing company in Paris, freelancing for The International Herald Tribune, La Tribune de Genève, and The Independent in London.

Back in Canada, she studied creative writing at University of Toronto, Concordia University, and was mentored by award winning novelist Sandra Birdsell through the Humber School for Writers.

A lifelong volunteer, her affiliations include: the YMCA, the Douglas Institute and is a board member of the Royal Conservatory of Music, the Quebec Writer’s Federation and Nazareth House, a shelter for the homeless. She is currently writing and researching her second book, the story of an Ottawa woman’s life-long struggle with schizophrenia. Her passions include music, mental illness, calligraphy and living a purposeful life.

Dr. Stephanie Protze

Dr. Protze optained her PhD in Cell Biology and Biomedicine from the International Max Planck Research School at the University of Dresden, Germany in 2012. For her Post Doctoral Fellowship she joined the laboratory of Dr. Gordon Keller the director of the McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine in Toronto, Canada, who has pioneered the application of human pluripotent stem cells for modeling of human development and disease. During her time at the McEwen Centre Dr. Protze specialized in human heart development with a specific focus on the heart’s pacemaker that regulates the heartbeat throughout live. When the heart’s pacemaker fails current standard treatment is the implantation of an electronic pacemaker that does have disadvantages like the need for recurrent battery replacement and the lack to adaption to growth in pediatric patients. Dr. Protze established a method for generating pacemaker cells from pluripotent stem cells and in an international collaboration with scientists from Technion, Israel provided first proof of principle that these pacemaker cells can function as biological pacemaker in a cell therapy approach, which in the future could overcome the disadvantages of electronic pacemaker devices.